Investigations – 2018

Please Scroll down to see bookings for 2018

Here you will find the details of team investigations for 2018, this page will be updated with the dates of the investigations as they are booked and with the results of each investigation as it takes place.

If you think you may have a haunted house or property, then please do not hesitate to contact us for a free investigation. You will receive an investigation report on what we found on the night as well as a certificate if we believe that it’s haunted

Investigations - 2018

Endcliffe Hall, Sheffield – 3rd February 2018

Endcliffe Hall is a 19th-century, 36-room mansion situated on Endcliffe Vale Road in the City of Sheffield in the suburb of Endcliffe. The hall is situated just over three km west of the city centre and is a Grade II* Listed building.

The present hall was built between the years of 1863 and 1865 by the Sheffield architects Flockton & Abbot for the Sheffield industrialist John Brown. Brown had acquired considerable wealth and prestige from the manufacture of armour plate from Bessemer steel at his Atlas Works in the city and wanted to build a private residence to reflect his position as one of the Nouveau riche industrialist of the Victorian Age. It is the largest private residence ever to have been built in Sheffield.
March - no investigation due to team commitments
Epping Forest Museum, Waltham Abbey – 28th April 2018

Epping Forest District Museum reopened on Saturday 19 March 2016 after a grant of nearly £2 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund has helping to pay for improved facilities and displays in the original building and an extension into the building next door with increased exhibition space and an activity room.

Housed in Grade II* listed Tudor building in Waltham Abbey, the museum tells the story of the district through its collections and displays. The newly redeveloped museum features six galleries, the opportunity to see behind the scenes, a lift making the entire building accessible and lovely new community space for all to use.
May - Public Investigation - Sandford Mill, Chelmsford - 12th May 2018

Sandford Mill, Chelmsford, Essex was originally a corn mill. The Mill building was constructed of timber and the mill stream ran underneath the centre of the building. The mill stream drove a large water wheel which provided the power for the mill. In 1880 a steam engine was installed to give additional power. Coal for the boiler came from Newcastle and was transported from Heybridge Basin to Sandford Mill by horse drawn barges.

In 1923 Chelmsford Corporation acquired the site for the new Borough Waterworks, construction began in 1926 and milling ceased. The corn mill was demolished but the two cottages which were built in 1905 were retained and are the only surviving part of the original mill. The new waterworks started operating in March 1929 although it was not officially opened until July 1930. The waterworks became redundant in 1984. All the buildings on site are now used by Chelmsford Museum.



Many of the children evacuees from London lived in the cottages surrounding the water works during the Second World War
Moira Furnace Museum, Leicestershire – 23rd June 2018

Moira Furnace is a nineteenth-century iron-making blast furnace located in Moira, Leicestershire, on the banks of the Ashby-de-la-Zouch Canal. Built by the Earl of Moira in 1804, the building has been preserved by North West Leicestershire District Council as a museum featuring lime kilns and craft workshops.

It is a most important industrial monument, since it is remarkably well-preserved, and dates from a formative period of the Industrial Revolution.
August - Public Investigation - Languard Fort, Felixstowe - 21st July 2018
Harwich Harbour, at the mouth of the river Orwell, has always been the best safe haven for large ships between the rivers Thames and Humber. The rivers Orwell, Stour and Deben stretch several miles inland and were ideal highways for trade and raiders. Landguard Fort dominated the navigable channel on the northern bank of the river Orwell, whilst the Redoubt at Harwich guarded the harbour entrance along with a large battery at Shotley.

There have been a number of fortifications built on the Landguard Peninsula over the years.

In 1543 Henry VIII had two blockhouses built which rapidly deteriorated, so in 1552 the guns were returned to the Tower of London. In 1628, a new Fort was built of earth revetted with wood. It was square with a bastion on each corner. In 1666, under Charles II, repairs were completed and a brick wall constructed around the Fort.

In 1667, during the second Dutch War, on the orders of Admiral de Ruyter, 1,500 Dutch marines (musketeers, pikemen, sailors (as grenadiers) and small cannon) landed at Cottage Point (now Cobbold’s Point) and under the command of Colonel Thomas Dolman (an English officer who had served with Cromwell and, like many professional soldiers, had changed sides) attacked the Fort from the landward side. The Duke of York and Albany’s Maritime Regiment of Foot, commanded by Captain Nathaniel Darell, repulsed the Dutch assault.

In 1717, a new brick Fort was constructed, but gave way to a new structure in 1744, when a new red brick Fort was built in the form of a pentagon, with a bastion at each corner. These walls remain today.

In 1871, the Fort was remodelled using yellow London bricks. All the internal accommodation buildings and the river facing battery, dating from 1780, were demolished. A seven gun casemate battery was constructed facing the river to house four 12.5 inch and three 10 inch Rifled Muzzle Loaded (RML) guns. Accommodation was in a semicircular block connected to the casemates to form an internal defensive position.

The south east curtain wall facing the sea had one 12.5 inch and two 10 inch RML guns in casemates and the two land facing bastions with Barbette mounted 9 inch RML guns.



In 1878, a submarine mining establishment was constructed by excavating a test room within the thick walls of the Fort, building an observation room and adding a main building on the east side of the Fort – known as the Ravelin Block. Stores and barracks were later demolished and are now underneath Landguard Terminal (part of the Port of Felixstowe). In 1901, because the existing armament of the Fort became obsolete, new batteries were built in front of the Fort facing the sea and river. These were named Left, Right and Darell’s Batteries.

After the main guns were removed, and for most of the 20th C. the Fort was used as barrack accommodation. In 1951 two of the old gun casemates were converted into a control room for ‘cold war’ use.

In 1956 the Coastal Artillery was disbanded and Landguard Fort no longer had a national military purpose. After 10 years of military neglect, the Fort was sealed up and left to quietly disintegrate until the 1980’s when local interest was aroused.

In 1997/8 the Fort was structurally consolidated by English Heritage, into whose care it had been placed, and is maintained and opened to the public on their behalf by the Landguard Fort Trust

In 1956 the Coastal Artillery was disbanded and Landguard Fort no longer had a national military purpose. After 10 years of military neglect, the Fort was sealed up and left to quietly disintegrate until the 1980’s when local interest was aroused.

In 1997/8 the Fort was structurally consolidated by English Heritage, into whose care it had been placed, and is maintained and opened to the public on their behalf by the Landguard Fort Trust



The Tolhouse has certainly had a turbulent history. Over the years it has been home to pirates, robbers and murderers as well as countless common crooks. It has been attacked by rebels and rioters and gutted by enemy bombs. Since the 1880s, the building has housed a museum. Today it tells the story of the building and of crime and punishment in Great Yarmouth through the ages.
August - Public Investigation - The Tolhouse Goal Museum - Great Yarmouth - 18th Aug 2018

At first sight, The Tolhouse seems strangely out of place, like a relic of a bygone age stranded amongst the modern streets, houses and offices of Great Yarmouth. When it was built about 800 years ago, it must have looked a grand place, with its sturdy stone walls, finely carved doorway and arched windows. Then it was the home of a rich merchant whose livelihood no doubt depended on the nearby quayside.

The TolhouseBefore long, however, the house passed into the hands of the Yarmouth town officials. So began its long association with the law, as the courtroom for various different types of courts, the town gaol with the notorious dungeon known as ‘the hold’, and a police station.
Private Event - Revesby Abbey - 29th September 2018


This charming merchant’s house, on the quayside in Great Yarmouth, was built around 1596 by Benjamin Cowper.

Home to merchants and prominent locals, over the years the building has seen several changes to its physical shape. Evidence of the developments made by its wealthy inhabitants can be seen throughout the building. Wood panelled rooms, richly decorated ceilings and the imposing stairway all help to tell the story of the Elizabethan House.
The house is famous for its connections with Oliver Cromwell who is said to have frequently visited his friend, John Carter, a prominent Yarmouth merchant who purchased the house from Benjamin Cowper in 1635.

The premises became a regular meeting place for Parliamentarians during the Civil War and it is here, allegedly, in November 1648 that the fate of Charles I was decided.
The house is famous for its connections with Oliver Cromwell who is said to have frequently visited his friend, John Carter, a prominent Yarmouth merchant who purchased the house from Benjamin Cowper in 1635.

October - Public Investigation -Elizabethan House Museum, Great Yarmouth – 27th October 2018

From 1667 some 14 different families lived in the house. In 1870, it was bought by the Aldred family and remained in their possession until the eldest daughter Mary Aldred bequeathed it to the National Trust. Her sister Blanche remained a tenant until her death in 1949. Norfolk Museums Service now manage the Elizabethan House for the National Trust.

The house contains fascinating collections from Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service. You can get hands on with the Elizabethan past in the bedroom (complete with replica costumes for you to try on) and find out about life ‘upstairs and downstairs’ for its Victorian inhabitants.

If you visit on one of our special event days, you may be lucky enough to see the range in the kitchen being fired up and have a chance to look at food created to period recipes; or talk to one of the costumed characters who can be found roaming the house!
Harwich Redoubt Fort – 24th November 2018

The Redoubt was built between 1808 and 1810 to protect the port of Harwich against the threat of Napoleonic invasion. It was part of the scheme that included the construction of 29 Martello Towers on the East Anglian coast. The Redoubt is of circular shape, approximately 200ft in diameter, with a central parade ground of 85ft diameter. Hoists lifted shells from the lower level to the gun emplacements. It is similar in design to earlier redoubts at Dymchurch and Eastbourne.

Though difficult to imagine as it is now surrounded by houses, when the Redoubt was built it was on a hill top with free views in all directions. A house was demolished to make way for the Redoubt, and a large elm tree – used by ships as a navigational mark – was also removed. It is said that French prisoners of war were made to help in the construction